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4 Signs You're fagged out as a Mom!


Fagged out: A state in which you are mentally unable to handle any more stress. A state in which your energy and mental resources are depleted.

We all have moments in time in which we feel stressed, but sometimes we don't even realize how burnt out we are even if others around us can see that we are. Being a fagged out mom is not only bad for you, but it's also bad for the people around you. Unfortunately, mothers are socialized to ignore their needs; taking care of us as mothers is considered selfish. Worse still, asking for help is seen as somewhat weak.


Forgetting Everything

Snapping at the Kids and Partner

Constantly Tired

Watering Down Your "Mom" Routine


Now What?

If you think you're burnt out, let's list some strategies that have helped friends of mine AND me in the past. Hopefully you'll find a tool here that resonates with you. Don't feel bad for being burnt out. Sometimes life does this to us. Sometimes we do this to ourselves by not reaching out for help. Try one of these strategies to take your stress down a few notches!
  • Stop Saying Yes: You might be fagged out from committing to too many responsibilities. Women feel bad saying no. Don't. If you are stretched to the limit, chances are your kids are too. Start practicing the word "no"!
  • Yoga, at Home: If you can't afford the time or money for a gym membership, try a yoga app or DVD. Many of my friends swear that yoga has helped reduce their stress levels and increased their energy.
  • Therapy: You may be burnt out because life has placed some difficulties on your plate like divorce, illness, pregnancy loss, death in the family, etc. No matter what the case, therapy may be just what you need.
  • Turn Off the Tech: I had my phone on way too late and was receiving work emails late at night, which subsequently stressed me and impacted my sleep. Reduce your use of tech. Turn off the phones, log off Facebook, and tune out.
  • Not Enough Hands: Does the majority of childcare fall in your lap? Is your partner taking the share? If you answered yes to the first question and no to the second, it's time to have an honest conversation with your partner about stepping up to the plate. A burnt-out partner will only end up affecting your spouse. If your spouse is taking on responsibility but you two still find yourselves drained or lacking the ability to get out together alone, seek out your children's teachers, moms groups, and Care.com for a reliable sitter if family won't help. If family will help, ask them!
  • Lower Your Expectations: Most likely, you expect 150 percent of yourself all the time, and it's not realistic and causing you stress. This doesn't mean let your kids run wild. This means going easier on yourself. Giving you credit where credit is due. Not nailing yourself to the wall with every mistake you make!
  • Anxiety Treatment: You might be prone to anxiety, which is causing you to burn out frequently or for long periods of time. Talking to a therapist or a doctor if you would like to go the medication route is a smart move. Yoga and the gym will also help deal with the beast called anxiety.
  • The Gym: If you can join, do it! You'll meet people, get in shape, and escape from everyone for a small part of your day. It can't hurt.
  • Foods: Are you eating well? How you treat your body will impact your mood.
  • A Child Issue: Is your child having difficulties whether developmentally, physically, or emotionally? Getting help for your child and possibly your family if needed will reduce the risk of burn-out. Talk to your pediatrician and or child's teacher for recommendations on how to help your little one with whatever battle he or she is facing.
Mommy burn-out isn't fun, but it doesn't have to persist. Be strong and ask for help. You are not an island or a miracle worker. Don't bite off more than you can chew or it will come back to bite you in the end.

Contributions from:PS
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